Delahanty discusses how he wants people viewing the interview in the future to respond to what they’ve heard and what

 

Delahanty discusses how his faith plays into him fighting for human rights as well as how the pope is using

 

Delahanty talks about some of the problems that exist still today that need to be worked on and dealt with.

 

Delahanty discusses his work associated with the abolishment of the death penalty in Kentucky. He tells of how he worked

 

Delahanty discusses his role in getting the Lindsey Scott case appealed for a retrial. He talks about the key people

 

Delahanty discusses the process of getting a halfway house built in the neighborhood where his parish is located in Louisville,

 

David Tandy is a Louisville Civic Leader. Tandy discusses his childhood in Owensboro, Kentucky, including his family, their occupations, the

 

David Tandy is a Louisville Civic Leader. Tandy discusses how he met the councilman that preceded him in his position

 

Shaw discusses how she attempts to not editorialize during her broadcasts, but that it is impossible to completely separate journalism

 

Shaw’s heroes are Georgia Davis Powers, Betty Baye, Marleen Davis, Nikki Finny, Crystal Wilkinson, Frank X and Bianca Sprigs. She

 

She talks about the loss of hope in poverty, which she calls poverty of spirit. She talks about the importance

 

Renee Shaw talks about her childhood and family background, growing up in rural Tennessee in a predominately white community. She

 

Renee talks about her career at KET, her interest in public policy and the legislature. She talks about various aspects

 

Delahanty discusses his memories of the Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy assassinations, as well as what actions he

 

Delahanty discusses his feelings towards the priest accused of molesting young boys, as well as how he thinks it showed

 

Delahanty discusses his family’s work for justice Father Patrick Delahanty is a priest and human rights advocate from Louisville, Kentucky.

 

Delahanty discusses his family’s work for justice. Father Patrick Delahanty is a priest and human rights advocate from Louisville, Kentucky.

 

Father Patrick Delahanty is a priest and human rights advocate from Louisville, Kentucky. Delahanty discusses his family’s work for justice

 

Akins recalls meeting her husband, Reverend C. B. Akins. Roszalyn Akins is the First Lady of the First Baptist Church

 

Akins recalls God telling her to pursue a piece of land for a new church. Roszalyn Akins is the First

 

Akins talks about the Bracktown community in Lexington. Roszalyn Akins is the First Lady of the First Baptist Church of

 

Akins talks about her husband becomming pastor at First Baptist Church Bracktown. They have been there over 30 years. Roszalyn

 

Hamilton talks about finding a studio for building his work and getting opportunities to sculpt religious icons. Ed Hamilton is

 

Hamilton talks about witnessing civil rights activism, but his mother being too protective to let him participate. Ed Hamilton is

 

Neblett talks about the importance of teaching children. Charles Neblett is a civil rights activist and founding member of The

 

Neblett talks about the power of singing as a motivator and as an organizing tool. Charles Neblett is a civil

 

Grundy talks about working at the Plymouth Settlement House, which served basic needs of the community while being structured around

 

Elliott voices his opinion that Dr. King was anointed by God. Dr. King told them not to hate, because it

 

Elliott relays the story of how he accepted God’s call to preach. Rev. Dr. Charles Elliott Jr. was born in

 

Elliott tells how he let women preach in his church and he got kicked out of the Association. Rev. Dr.

 

Elliott recalls his parents Gertrude Elliott and Charles Elliott Sr and 12 siblings. Rev. Dr. Charles Elliott Jr. was born

 

Elliott stresses the importance of getting an education. No one can take that away from you. Rev. Dr. Charles Elliott

 

Elliott recalls being in the car with Dr. King when white folks were protesting open housing in Louisville. They proceeded

 

McMurry takes on the abuse case against the Catholic Diocese of Louisville. He wins. But he doesn’t stop there, he

 

Watts described her idyllic childhood and education. Beverly Watts is the Executive Director of the Tennessee Commission on Human Rights.

 

Watts recalls her childhood in Hopewell, Tennessee reflecting on her “rainbow family” and segregated schools. Beverly Watts is the Executive

 

Anderson was in charge of Dr. King’s visit to Chicago. King spoke in 14 neighborhoods and led a march downtown.

 

Anderson reflects on the success (or lack thereof) of Albany, GA and of Dr. King’s northern strategy, specifically in Chicago.

 

Anderson recalls the community organizing scene in Chicago in the 1960s. Alan Anderson is the author of Confronting the Color

 

Anderson went to the University of Chicago (on the South Side of Chicago) and belonged to an integrated Methodist Church.

 

Cunningham talks about the involvement and support of the church during the movement. Raoul Cunningham was born in 1943 and

 

John Johnson talks about the importance of school and church in an African American community. John Johnson was born in

 

Suzy Post recalls when the Cambodian bombings precipitated a plan for a New Years Day anti-war meeting at the Unitarian

 

Suzy Post says she always felt that religion was a form of social control and she also believed that when

 

The Civil Rights Movement has contributed to major change, but there is still more work to be done. Mattie Jones

 

Mattie Jones talks about her decision to get involved in the Civil Rights Movement. Mattie Jones is a civil rights

 

Mattie Jones relates joining the Civil Rights Movement to confessing to Christ. Mattie Jones is a civil rights activist in

 

Edgardo Mansilla discusses the interpretation of the Bible and how growing up as a religious man helped him to have

 

Edgardo Mansilla reflects on growing up Baptist in a Catholic society and the importance of reading books as a child.

 

Edgardo Mansilla dicusses differences in poverty in America versus other parts of the world and how being a Christian and

 

Edgardo Mansilla talks about an experience at a Louisville meeting about refugees. Edgardo Mansilla was born in Argentina in 1953.