David Tandy is a Louisville Civic Leader. Tandy discusses what he wants people listening to the interview in the future

 

David Tandy is a Louisville Civic Leader. Tandy talks about meeting his wife, getting married, having children, and raising his

 

Delahanty discusses how he wants people viewing the interview in the future to respond to what they’ve heard and what

 

Delahanty discusses how his faith plays into him fighting for human rights as well as how the pope is using

 

Delahanty talks about some of the problems that exist still today that need to be worked on and dealt with.

 

Shaw talks about her hopes for Kentucky in terms of finding common values, combating poverty, and increasing representation of marginalized

 

Shaw talks more about people who influenced her life and career. She talks more about the importance of exposing children

 

She discusses how reporters focusing on their careers and their next opportunity means that they do not focus on the

 

Shaw talks about different ways of reporting on issues and how they affect audiences. She gives the example of reporting

 

David Tandy is a Louisville Civic Leader. Tandy discusses his childhood in Owensboro, Kentucky, including his family, their occupations, the

 

David Tandy is a Louisville Civic Leader. Tandy briefly talks about Jesse Jackson’s run for president and his influence over

 

David Tandy is a Louisville Civic Leader. Tandy discusses the different projects he was part of while he was a

 

David Tandy is a Louisville Civic Leader. Tandy discusses how he met the councilman that preceded him in his position

 

Shaw’s heroes are Georgia Davis Powers, Betty Baye, Marleen Davis, Nikki Finny, Crystal Wilkinson, Frank X and Bianca Sprigs. She

 

She talks about the loss of hope in poverty, which she calls poverty of spirit. She talks about the importance

 

Renee Shaw talks about her childhood and family background, growing up in rural Tennessee in a predominately white community. She

 

Delahanty discusses the books that he read during the time of the civil rights disputes in the sixties as a

 

Delahanty discusses his memories of the Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy assassinations, as well as what actions he

 

Delahanty discusses his family’s work for justice Father Patrick Delahanty is a priest and human rights advocate from Louisville, Kentucky.

 

Delahanty discusses his family’s work for justice. Father Patrick Delahanty is a priest and human rights advocate from Louisville, Kentucky.

 

Hamilton talks about learning from other black artists and absorbing black history. Ed Hamilton is a sculptor living in Louisville,

 

Hamilton recalls getting involved in the civil rights movement through his art and art groups. Ed Hamilton is a sculptor

 

Hamilton talks about meeting his mentor, Kentucky sculptor Barney Bright. Barney asks Ed to be his apprentice. Ed Hamilton is

 

Hamilton talks about meeting his mentor, Kentucky sculptor Barney Bright. He also recalls his past work history and making art

 

Logan recalls learning compassion from his grandfather. George Logan is a civil rights activist from Lexington, KY. This interview took

 

Wallace recalls the story of her grandmother in the Netherlands who harbored people being persecuted by the Nazis. Wallace summarizes

 

Owens talks about going to Central State College and its community feel. Darryl Owens is a Kentucky State Representative and

 

Owens talks about going to the law program at Howard University and Thurgood Marshall. Darryl Owens is a Kentucky State

 

Grundy talks about Frank X. Walker. Chester Grundy is a Diversity Advisor for the University of Kentucky. This interview took

 

Grundy talks about meeting an influential black intellectual at UK. Chester Grundy is a Diversity Advisor for the University of

 

Wallace endows a chair in Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality at the University of Louisville in honor of black, lesbian,

 

Wallace reflects on the significance of the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame, how she felt about being inducted herself

 

Neal remembers receiving the guidance of mentors like Lyman T. Johnson when he was a young man. He continues the

 

Wallace is torn when she is faced with coming out as gay and wonders how this will affect her reputation

 

Neal recalls moving to the African American Subdivision Algonquin Gardens. He recalls the many professionals living in the neighborhood. He

 

Neal talks of the importance of growing up around people who you see as successful. He emphasizes education and the

 

Neal learned from his son when he brought 10 white friends home from school. Gerald Neal is a Kentucky State

 

Elliott reflects on other Civil Rights leaders of Louisville. Rev. Dr. Charles Elliott Jr. was born in Wheeler, Alabama in

 

Elliott recalls being in the car with Dr. King when white folks were protesting open housing in Louisville. They proceeded

 

Davis recalls the story of having a door closed in her face by a white man when she was a

 

Davis credits her fifth grade teacher Olive Bopp with guiding her into writing. Merlene Davis graduated from the University of

 

Watts explains how her experience at SIU Carbondale was a culture shock. She became an activist advocate for racial justice

 

Anderson discusses the leadership style of Jesse Jackson. Alan Anderson is the author of Confronting the Color Line which was

 

Anderson says Dr. King was more galvanizing in retrospect than he was at the time. Alan Anderson is the author

 

Georgia Powers speaks about her childhood, her parents and gender roles that were taught to her growing up. Georgia Davis

 

John Johnson talks about the importance of strong black role models. John Johnson was born in Franklin, Kentucky and is

 

John Johnson talks about the Little Rock Nine and NAACP Youth Advisor Daisy Bates. John Johnson was born in Franklin,

 

John Johnson talks about Althea Simmons, the Director of Training for the NAACP. John Johnson was born in Franklin, Kentucky

 

John Johnson talks about Rosa Parks and being involved in organizing her funeral in Montgomery Alabama. John Johnson was born

 

The Civil Rights Movement has contributed to major change, but there is still more work to be done. Mattie Jones

 

Mattie Jones recalls her teachers in high school and the importance of her education. Mattie Jones is a civil rights